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Cooking Up A Career

Byron Franz, also known as Chef B, has been cooking since he was 13 years old, and since he can remember, he has always loved doing so.

10 years later, his passion for food is still there, and with the help of his mentor, celebrity chef DeMarco Cavil, Franz is starting to see a lot of opportunity in the cooking industry.

Chef DeMarco Cavil, who has cooked for the likes of Magic Johnson, Dwayne Wade and Bill Clinton, has trusted Franz to be his guest chef on multiple occasions.

“He will message me whenever he needs me, and I’ll go up there (Twin Cities) to help him out.  Sometimes I don’t know what I’m going into when I go up there,” Franz said.  “As summer progresses, he’s talked about us feeding the Minnesota Twins and the Minnesota United Men’s Soccer team.”

Chef DeMarco will secure a gig and message Franz to meet him at the address.

“He will bring all the food there, and I will help him finish it off and do any of the last steps,” Franz said.  “When we do these gigs, we try to have 75 percent of the food done, so that when we show up to these people’s homes, we are only spending 45 minutes to an hour there at the max.”

With a rate of $125 per plate, Franz dishes up an appetizer, entrée and a dessert.  But for first time customers, Franz lets them eat for free.

“It’s more of a way to get myself out there, and if I can do that, I think it goes a long way to show them that I actually care about my work.”

Franz has delivered his creations and hosted meals at his house in an effort to get clients hooked on his product.  This way when he opens up shop, he can get returning customers right away.

He is able to make money now from donations and tips, while also getting paid when he helps Chef DeMarco.

In an effort to get his name known, Franz has been messaging many celebrities and athletes to try and set up dates to cook for them.  To his surprise, a few responded, such as Naz Reid of the Timberwolves, and Mr. Hotspot, a Hip-Hop artist.

“When I messaged them, I didn’t expect them to actually look at their DMs because a lot of them will have their DMs still go through their general and have hundreds of messages from their fans,” Franz said.  “When they do respond back, it’s kind of a weird feeling, like these famous people are noticing your work, and they want you to come down and cook for them.”

Franz is hoping to have menu put together in the coming weeks so he can start taking orders from clients.

He usually cooks in themes for the week.  If customers like what they see, they can order from his Facebook page, or text him directly.

This week’s theme was chicken and waffles.

Earlier this week, he made waffle cones filled with mac n’ cheese and chicken.

The meal he cooked in this picture is waffle tacos with a mac n’ cheese base, filled with deep fried chicken and drizzled with a sweet honey barbecue sauce.  He then toped it off with bacon bits and chives for the garnish.

Chef B’s Chicken Waffle Tacos.

Franz journey as a chef started when he was 13 years old, cooking for his parents, grandparents and friends.  Right away, he knew this is what he loved to do.

From there he started volunteering at his church and cooking for his youth group, before getting his first job as a kitchen aid at the Good Samaritan Nursing home when he was 15.

He worked at the Good Samaritan all through high school before having to leave for college where he would chase his music dreams in Kansas.  Eventually releasing an electronic album titled ‘The Journey’ on iTunes, ultimately putting his cooking career to the side.

Things did not feel right for Franz, and after a few years away, he return home. And in 2018, he got his old job back at the Good Samaritan.

This time, as the head cook.

“The nursing home was the perfect spot for me,” Franz said.  “I got to cook for a large crowd, and it taught me food cost and food waste.  I learned a lot of what I know from there.”

Franz eventually moved on from the nursing home and took two jobs as a cook at a bar and grill called Duffy’s and a bar and grill called The Den.

After only a few months of working, Franz received a promotion at The Den and decided to work there full time.

The Den is where Franz found his love for cooking again.

He decided to take a step away from music, and apply for culinary school at South Central in Mankato, MN.

Here is where he met Chef DeMarco and took his cooking to the next level.

Franz became known locally for some of the meals he prepared like the one below.

Another Chef B creation.

But, it was his noodle cup creation, inspired by Trendy Chef, that really gained him a following.

“After I made my first noodle cup, I’ve taken the idea of being this out of the box chef, and just come up with weird creations.  It’s given me lots of attention on my social media, I have people in my DMs saying, ‘I wish you were in Atlanta, I wish you were in Texas, or New York.’ Or they will message me saying ‘what’s it going to take to get you out here.’  So, the hard work is definitely paying off, and it’s showing.”

One of Chef B’s noodle cups.

“It’s hard sometimes though, I just won’t know what to make,” Franz said. “I go to these celebrity chef profiles and gather ideas from them, and just combine them all in one dish.”

Franz does take pride in the look of his meals, but he prefers the taste to be what he is known for.

“Our professors told us, ‘you can have a plate that looks like a million-dollar plate, but it might not even taste good,’” Franz said.  “’But you can have some food that looks like a disaster and be one of the better things you’ve tasted.’”

Experimenting with different combinations, not everything turns out well for Franz.  So, he throws it away, and try’s and try’s again.

“I’ve always told myself, ‘you’re the chef, you’re allowed to do whatever you want in the kitchen,’” Franz said.  “I want to be different, and that forces me to step outside of the box.  That’s the kind of chef I aspire to be, a chef that isn’t afraid to mix flavors that don’t normally go with each other.”

Franz’s wants to be based out of Minnesota, but the ultimate goal is to travel with athletes and families as their personal chef.  He also mentioned a dream of becoming the Minnesota Timberwolves chef if traveling doesn’t work.

He is waiting for the corona virus to pass to get his first gig alone, but says as long as he is confident, he is sure he will kill it.  And from there, word of mouth will do its thing to keep the customers coming.

“This first opportunity under my brand is the biggest thing that’s going to happen in my life and is going to be the thing that changes my life,” Franz said.

With his logo selected, business cards made, and t shirts being sent out.  Franz, or more famously known as Chef B, is fully branded and ready to get his business running.

Chef B’s business cards.

Here is a link to his Facebook page where you can book meals, see his past creations and read reviews from his customers.

https://www.facebook.com/chefbdog96

 

Side Hustle- Sports Podcasting

Having the same conversation over and over can be tiresome, especially when you’re talking in circles.

One of the most common debates in sports is, “Moss is better than Rice,” or vice versa, and it usually gets nowhere.

That’s why in 2014, Garret Greenlee created a Twitter and YouTube channel where he could prove his sports-related thoughts through facts.

“I got sick of having the same conversation with people like, ‘man this guy’s good, or this guy’s good,’” Greenlee said.  “I just created an account and thought whatever happens, happens.”

The accounts grew rapidly.

After four years, Greenlee’s Best NFL Matchups had more than 20,000 followers on Twitter.

Only problem was, he had no idea what email he used when he made the account.

“I was following people way too fast, so Twitter thought I was a spam account,” Greenlee said.  “They sent an email to the account I had with it, but I had no idea what that email was, and I lost the account forever.”

Greenlee had to start all over.

Lucky for him, he had a couple friends with similar accounts, and they gave him a shout out to help build his new channel, Football Analysis.

“I only have 1,500 subscribers on YouTube right now.  Not ‘only,’ like I’m grateful for them, but I want to get to the point where I’m at 30, 40, 50, 100 thousand subscribers and do a giveaway once a month of a signed whatever,” Greenlee said.  “I do appreciate the support, but I want to get to a point where I can use this as a side income just for talking about what I love, which is football.”

Greenlee’s set up.

How does Greenlee make money with these videos?

“You have to have 1,000 subscribers,” Greenlee said.  “But within the past year, you also have to have four thousand watch hours of your content. So that took a little bit to build up.”

Four thousand hours may seem like a lot, but with browse features, you can reach more people than just your subscribers, which happened to Greenlee a few times.

“I have a couple with 30 thousand, 20 thousand views and that really gets a lot of the hours at almost the snap of your fingers,” Greenlee said.  “So, in reality you could have one video that has 60 or 100 thousand views, and you get your four thousand hours, then the rest of your videos combined could have only 500 views.”

Since the interview, Greenlee has reached the 2,000-subscriber mark with his new account.

The content is starting to pay off.

He explains this in the video.

Andy Carlson, a Winona State graduate and creator of the Purple FTW! podcast, said a Vikings vs Ravens blizzard game in 2013 sparked his interest in talking sports.

Carlson looks at all the players on the Vikings roster and analyzes the national media coverage of the Vikings, while adding his own twist of humor for his 23,000 subscribers.

“There will always be a market for fan content,” Carlson said.  “People want niched down perspective over national media jabronis.”

Here is a clip from a recent video.

With this being his side job, Carlson said he always finds the motivation to release numerous videos a day.

“The viewers who continue to make us part of their day (motivates me),” Carlson said.  “If we can be a nice little five minute break from life and give some info and some entertainment. Worth it.”

Carlson offers monthly memberships for $4.99 and $24.99 on his YouTube channel that offers extra benefits such as one-on-one chats and free merchandise.

Teespring has teamed up with Carlson and Purple FTW! to sell this merchandise that includes t-shirts, mugs and stickers.

Purple FTW! merchandise for sale on Teespring.

“It’s a very decent side hustle,” Carlson said.  “Merch is fun, and everything helps keep the production lights on.”

With the quarantine giving people more free time than ever, podcasts and YouTube may be a good pass time to listen to, or maybe even try.

Football Analysis Link

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjoHPnySKcDbxzaF2R8YM2Q

Purple FTW! Link

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Xt29Fi1ES6C1fEtWFUFIw

New Winona apartments to upstage other housing options

The residential scene in Winona caters to different groups of people, predominantly college students from August to May.

A new downtown apartment complex called Main Square Winona is aiming to be the updated hub for business professionals and the wealthy in town.

From a third-floor balcony, a view of Winona’s downtown amenities can be seen.

According to Tom Hoseck, Main Square Winona’s lead property manager, the complex will have two primary buildings: the Landmark on Main and 5th Streets and the Cornerstone, which is on Main and 4th.

While Landmark is housing with one, two- and three-bedroom units, Cornerstone also has space for retail offices.

Amenities like a fitness center, rooftop terraces and meeting room will be shared between residents, Hoseck said.

Speaking about the draw for living at Main Square, Hoseck mentioned proximity.

“Living here gives people everything they could need within walking distance,” Hoseck said. “Plus, we’ll be adding conveniences for residents like an orthodontist, hair salon and a walk-in clinic. We want people who live here to feel like they never have to leave.”

A complex marketed as luxury must live up to that in rental prices.

An average one-bedroom rental in the Landmark building runs $1,300 per month For the Cornerstone building, a one-bedroom suite begins at $875 a month.

In a city that’s predominantly college students, how do these rates stack up to dorms?

And would the apartments appeal to college students?

According to Paula Scheevel, Winona State University’s director of housing and residence life, the dorms are a better price.

Unlike the price of the new apartment complexes, the rates of dorms were decided by the original cost to build and maintain the dorm.

In WSU’s Quad, which is a building made up of four separate other dorms, an average room is $2,800 for the academic year.

While college students pay off all charges in chunks, the average rent would come out to $350, per the housing and residence life yearly budget.

They also have stipulations through the MinnState system that all dorms must be built to withstand 100 years of residents and be paid off in 20 years.

Because Scheevel has been in her position for 16 years, she also has data on retention rate in the dorms.

“Thirty percent of people who live in res halls are returners, and that adds up to about one third of the overall student population,” Scheevel said.

She expounded on why she thought the university had those numbers.

“It’s ultimately about the value of the dollar. Our convenient location, dining plan and community in res life makes it a top choice.”

In terms of how the dorms stack up to the new apartments, Scheevel said she didn’t think Main Square Winona aimed to be for college living.

Paula Scheevel posing in her office space for housing and residence life
Paula Scheevel, director of housing and residence life, stands in her domain in Kryzsko Commons where students can apply to live on campus and inquire about other aspects of campus life.

“To my knowledge, the complexes are geared toward those who are well-off and looking for housing not directed at college students,” Scheevel said.

To live in the Cornerstone, which is the cheaper of the two luxury complexes, for one school year, it would be a 150 percent increase over residence halls at the university.

And that’s just an average dorm room cost.

By comparing the cost of Main Square Winona to the most upscale dorms on campus, Kirkland-Haake, an average room in the four-person complex is $3,650.

Calculated out, monthly rent from a dorm to this luxury complex would increase by 91 percent.

Depending on where you live, you get what you pay for.

Question is, who’s willing to pay that much?

Restoring Culture at Cotter

The game clock dwindles down to the final seconds as the players shake each other’s hands.

Adding the polite comment of, “good game” or, “way to shoot the rock.”

The buzzer sounds.

It’s 95-42.

The Winona Cotter boys’ basketball team has been eliminated, ending their season with a record of 2 wins, 24 losses.

For many, this would seem like a season to forget.

For the Ramblers, they have a lot to be proud of.

This was the first year for Cotter head coach TJ Lowe.

Lowe, a former college athlete and skills trainer, has worked with players on reaching goals, but has never had a whole team to lead.

“I did a lot of individual work with people,” Lowe said.  “Like somebody that’s Division-II and they want to get to a better school, or even Division-I.”

Lowe started with the boy’s freshmen team at Winona Cotter during the 2015/16 season  before working his way up to Junior Varsity.

Coach Lowe drawing up a game plan for the Ramblers.

There he coached for two years before a job promotion pulled him away.

After a year away from the teams, Lowe found a way to clear his schedule, and according to him, was asked back by “popular demand.”

Coming into the 2019-20 season, the Cotter boys’ basketball program had not had a winning record in their division for the past ten years (MNBasketballHub.) Coach Lowe wasn’t sure what he was getting when he held the first practice last fall.

“They were freshmen when I was still there, so one or maybe two kids would come up for a half in a tournament and I’d let them play a couple minutes,” Lowe said. “Other than that, I knew nothing about my team.”

The team rostered only three seniors, two of those injured, and a bunch of juniors and sophomores who hadn’t seen solid minutes at the varsity level.

Worse, the team had become used to losing.  The narrative surrounding the Cotter boy’s basketball program had dropped significantly since their championship runs of the 1980s.

Coach Lowe said he believes he can reinstate the powerhouse narrative of Cotter basketball.  He knows it’s going to be one step at a time.

“I think a lot of kids don’t get to their full potential because the mental side of it is holding them back,” Lowe said. “All year I said, ‘we have to come together as a team first, we can’t bicker.’”

Being able to play as a team helped the Ramblers secure two victories on the season, but there were many more successes being made throughout the year.

After the first couple losses, Coach Lowe rallied his team , and promised improvement.

“First they came in hanging their heads, and I said, ‘Hey, this is just the beginning.  We are going to put time in the gym, and we are going to get better,’” Lowe said.  “We have to believe that we are going to do that, we have to take these steps.  Next thing you know, people are starting to shoot better, we had multiple people in the top 100 of Minnesota basketball, in all divisions.”

Seeing the ball go through the hoop is definitely a confidence booster, but Lowe said he knew that was the beginning.

“The next hump was knowing what it was like to maintain a lead or be able to stay in the game,” Lowe said.  “We did get the one win against Coulee-Christian, but that is the one we were expecting to win.”

Thinking of the progress as a step by step solution sounds like a simple task.  It is not.

“You have to go through the trials and tribulations.  Otherwise you have no idea what you are doing out there,” Lowe said.  “They could have easily just said, ‘this blows, I don’t want to be here.’  But man, they just kept with it and I was very proud of them.”

Having a good relationship with the players is a must for Lowe.  With team and individual meetings, he has a chance to talk with each player and know what’s going on.

Ryan Todd has been around the Cotter boys’ basketball program for a few years as the junior varsity coach and has noticed the changing narrative of the varsity program.

“It’s not so much winning and losing games,” Todd said.  “Seeing their skills improve, and getting comfortable on the floor I think helps them buy in.  It’s night and day how much better we are from the first practice.”

Watching the final game of the season, the progress and effort can be seen by anyone in the crowd.

Down 43-4 to start the game, frustration was running high as, “oh my god, we’re bad,” was muttered on the bench during a stretch of turnovers by one of the players.

Coach Lowe called a timeout and brought his team back together.

The ensuing five minutes was like watching a completely different team.

Plays were being executed, shots were falling, defensive stops were being made, and next thing they knew, they went on a 14-4 run against the number one team in the section.

Coach Lowe called another time out and brought his players in.

From the huddle you could hear Coach Lowe yelling, “this is how it is, this is how it could be!”

“This is how it is, this is how it could be!”

The game did end 95-42, but the second half was much closer than the first.

“It’s amazing how far we came, especially in a section like ours.  It was so easy to give up, but we kept stepping forward,” Lowe said.  “They made such a big jump this year, it was amazing, I’m very happy.”

Links

https://www.mnbasketballhub.com/standings/show/5372012?subseason=651301

Parking causes issues for Friendship Center

The Friendship Center in Downtown Winona needs more parking as it is the number one complaint from members.  

The issue comes mostly because the Friendship Center serves the senior citizens of the area, many of whom have a harder time walking long distances or making it across the street in the time allowed. 

Roxy Kohner has been a member of the center for almost 11 years. She said sometimes she will come to the center an hour before an event to wait out a close enough parking spot. 

“I have driven by and without a place to park I had to turn around and go back because there wasn’t anything within the walking distance that I can do,” Kohner said. “I have also staked out parking. So I have come an hour ahead of time and I will park and do something in my car till I can watch and see someone pull out.” 

Malia Fox, director of the Friendship Center, said this is the most frequent complaint the center gets. 

A report from 2018 state there is adequate parking for the City of Winona. 

The report titled “Parking Study: Downtown Winona” was created by Walker Consultants. They studied an area of 42 blocks between the Mississippi River, Winona Street, Broadway Street and Kanas Street. 

Walker Consultants found that in the study area there were about 4,030 spaces available of which about 3,205 spaces were for public use. 

Parking continues to be a problem for the Friendship Center despite the findings in the Walker report.  

Across Fifth Street from the Friendship Center is the Main Street Square Development. The construction workers and equipment take up many spots that are closest to the center, which has caused more lack of parking.

Winona Major, Mark Peterson, said parking has been an issue for the center since it started 40 years ago. 

“The complaints are very real which is why the city has been looking at a solution to solving the problem,” Peterson said. “The past couple of years the city has seriously been considering moving the center.”

There will be a meeting on Nov. 13 to discuss parking further. 

There was talk from the city about knocking down the old middle school auditorium and creating a parking lot there. 

According to Kohner, that would not fix the problem.

“That is a band-aid because many of us have limited mobility. So even if we do have parking you’re talking two blocks away,” Kohner said. “I won’t be able to go two blocks either. I can go a block if a stretch it, half a block is perfect.” 

One quasi-solution the center had was making a deal with Wesely United Methodist Church which is next door to them. The Friendship Center can use the church’s parking area as long as the church does not have an event going on. 

The parking the church said the center can use is not reserved for the Friendship Center. It is public parking. 

The center has a membership of 1,000 people with an average daily attendance of 125. They also have staff coming in and out of the building every day. 

According to Fox, the Main Street Square Development across the street has hindered their membership. 

“In the last 6-8 months that this development has been occurring, we are watching our numbers drop for the first time in 25 years,” Fox said. 

The story behind Pickwick Mill

The Pickwick Mill in Pickwick, Minnesota, started in 1856 by Thomas Grant and Wilson Davis. 

The building started as a sawmill but was later converted to produce flour. It is the oldest flour mill found in Southeast Minnesota. 

The mill was a water-powered gristmill on Big Trout Creek. 

In 1917 the roof was damaged by a cyclone. When it was repaired they put a flat roof on instead of the gable roof. 

When the historical society took it over they returned the roof to the gable roof it originally had. 

The mill has several flights of stairs each with the names of people who have worked there.

Now the mill is still intact but is no longer used to make flour. It stands as a historic site and museum. 

George Johnson, of Rushford, Minnesota, visited the mill on Saturday, Oct. 5. He said he thought it was a beautiful historic place. 

Jeff Wershofen started working at the mill as a child because it was where there was adult supervision. 

Throughout the mill, there are flour bags hung. On the top floor of the mill, they have many strung together with other artifacts.

Wershofen described his experience at the mill as part of a perfect childhood. 

To find out more about Pickwick Mill and Wershofen’s experiences watch the following video.

Summer camps return to Winona State

Winona State University summer camps will return to campus starting in June after the majority of students have left Winona concluding finals week.

Camps offered at Winona State this summer include Camp Invention, College for Kids, Grandparents University, H.O.P.E. Academy, Lego Mindstorms, Scrubs Camp and a variety of athletic camps.

A Lego Mindstorms camper shows off his project. Submitted photo.

Ann Durley, interim assistant director of the Camps and Conferences Offices at Winona State, said some of the camps are created by Winona State and are hosted by faculty and staff and other camps are independent.

“Each summer we have a number of camps that we either offer using our faculty and staff or camps that we solicit, or contract, to come to our university and provide the camp,” Durley said.

The camps offered are either day camps or overnight camps, and last between two and nine days.

Durley described the typical camper turn-out rate she has seen in previous summers.

Camp Invention, which focuses on teaching students how to invent and build things, is one of Winona State’s most popular independent camps, according to Durley.

“It’s a really well-run camp,” Durley said. “Every year the number increases. I think we have close to 100 or anywhere from 70 to 100 people participating in it this year, so it’s a pretty big camp.”

Durley also talked about the success of Winona State’s Scrubs Camp, which is created for ninth through 12th grade students interested in medical careers.

A Scrubs camper practices drilling into leg bone with the help of one of her counselors. Submitted photo.

She said a study of 120 students who had participated in Scrubs Camp was conducted a few years back and determined one out of ten of those students attended Winona State.

Winona State’s athletic camps, which are run by the university’s athletics department, also bring in around 200 students every summer, according to Durley.

She said with the variety of camps offered at Winona State, the tally of campers each summer is around 2,000.

Durley said Winona State students can get involved with the summer camps by applying for a summer assistant position.

Typically, Winona State faculty and staff, as well as local and regional teachers, are hired as teachers and counselors for the camps created by the university.

Winona State students are hired by Durley to manage the front desk of residence halls for the overnight campers. They also act as RAs and are sometimes required to provide activities for students in the evenings.

Emma Ponto, a sophomore human resources major at Winona State and former camper, was recently hired by Durley for one of the summer assistant positions.

Emma Ponto, a sophomore human resources major at Winona State University, will be working June through August as a program assistant for WSU Summer Camps.

Ponto said her duties as a summer assistant will include opening and closing the residence halls between the spring and summer, cleaning dorm rooms for campers and creating bulletin boards and signs for the walls and doors within the dorms.

“We’re going to have to work the desk too,” Ponto said. “We’ll be mainly out of Kirkland, Haake and East Lake, so we’re kind of going to be, not necessarily camp counselors, but walking the students from building to building so they don’t get lost and then we’re just a person for them if they have questions they can come to us.”

Ponto also talked about her previous experience as a Winona State summer camp participant.

“When I did the camps here, that many years ago because I was going into sixth grade, then going into seventh grade and then going into eighth,” Ponto said. “I did the Jazz Band camp and I don’t think we have it here anymore.”

Ponto said during her camp’s three-day time frame, she and other campers would learn and practice jazz music for their concert, which took place on the camp’s last day.

She said attending summer camp at Winona State contributed to her decision to go to college here.

“We had a concert here outside and I remember telling my grandma, I was like, ‘I’m going to go to school here one day.’ And then I did,” Ponto said.

Ponto said she is looking forward to the camps starting soon, as she is excited to be participating in them once again.

“I remember when I went here, I was really shy and I still am, but I was way worse then,” Ponto said. “We were hanging out in (Prentiss-Lucas) after the day and I had remembered talking to the staff and I thought they were so cool and I wanted to be like them, so it’s kind of fun to be back and I actually get to be them.”

Durley said she is also looking forward to the camps starting because they make use of the university’s space during the summer months when most Winona State students typically return home.

“Obviously, we have this campus as a resource,” Durley said. “We have buildings, there’s classrooms and facilities that aren’t being used, so, like a lot of great businesses, the university is like, ‘What can we do to provide, to get these spaces used during the summer?’ and at the same time, provide something for the community as a bridge because we do want to see those youth think about us in terms of coming here to this campus in the future as a student.”

2019 Warriors Season Preview

Coach Sawyer previews the 2019 Winona State Warriors Football Season.

The Winona State University Warriors football team started spring practice in preparation for their upcoming 2019 season.

The Warriors, who missed the playoffs in 2018, finished 8-3 and are returning 17 starters from last year’s team.

The 2019 team will have 15 practices including the spring game on April 27. The Warriors, who lost 14 starters to injury during the 2018 season, are looking to put an injury-plagued season behind them.

Senior linebacker Nick Pridgeon, who suffered a knee injury in the second game of the 2018 season, said his goal for 2019 is to stay healthy.

“Really just comeback strong,” Pridgeon said. “Just really finish out the season.”

Pridgeon said he should be cleared from his ACL injury by mid-summer.

Tom Sawyer, WSU’s head football coach, said the future is bright this year.

“The silver lining is a lot of other kids got experience,” Sawyer said. “We got all of those kids that were injured they’re all back, plus the experience our other kids got.”

For three years, the Warriors have been in a trend of getting speed up front. Now, with more scholarship money, they were able to put the money to get higher-profile, larger athletes for the offensive line.

Winona State Warriors offense huddles up after doing practice drills.

“Two years ago, we signed four kids, last year we signed five,” Sawyer said. This year, the Warriors have five additional guys coming, putting them over the 300 pound-average mark.

The Warriors, with their rebuilt offensive line, know they have a job to do, which is to be physical.

Joe Holtzclaw, offensive line coach, said his close-knit unit will be different.

“We want to protect the passer first and foremost,” Holtzclaw said.

When running the ball, Holtzclaw said the offensive line is physical by nature.

On the defensive side of the ball, defensive assistant Lee Pronschinske, said he wants his group to continue flying around and cause turnovers.

“We always want to communicate, disrupt the ball and create turnovers,” Pronschinske said. “That’s big when the defense can get the offense the ball back on a short field.”

Pronschinske said he is already seeing the linebackers and defensive backs causing turnovers in practice.

“We haven’t been too handsy because we’re playing against our own teammates, so we don’t want to get too physical, maybe cause an injury,” Pronschinske said.  “We’ve been playing off a little bit that way, but it’s still been nice to see our guys fly around.”

Pridgeon said the defense has to focus on their technique and it all starts with attention to detail and accountability.

“We have a young group but a lot of talent,” Pridgeon said. “A lot of leadership in the young group as well. Really our main focus going into the season is trying to do the best as we can and reach our full potential.”

Sawyer said he wants the preparation and planning to be right, to give them their best chance at a win.

“We just have to make sure we’re planning right, preparing them right and give us the best chance to win,” Sawyer said.

The Warriors start their 2019 season at Maxwell Field Saturday, Sept. 7, against Wayne State College of Wayne, Nebraska.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years after, Assault’s Effects Remain

By Madelyn Swenson

 

I am the one in five.

The one in five girls who will be sexually assaulted as a child.

I was 14. It was a cool summer day. My grandma — my dad’s mom — and her boyfriend were coming for dinner.

My grandpa died before I was born so my grandma’s boyfriend, Wallie, was my grandpa.

That changed in a matter of minutes.

I asked Wallie to come downstairs to get measurements for a shelf he was making me for my new room.

As we were walking out of the room to go upstairs, he pulled me in for a hug.

I hated hugging him.

He pulled out of the hug and brushed my breasts, like he always did.

I turned to walk away, and he pulled me in from behind and started to feel me up.

I froze.

I did not know what to do.

Suddenly, I tried to move to go upstairs.

But he held me in place and whispered in my ear.

“Just one more feel.”

I said, “No,” meekly and forced his hands off me and ran upstairs.

I kept quiet all through dinner and ice cream.

It was not till my mom called me that night and asked how my day was that I broke down.

She asked where my dad was, in her worried mom way.

I left my room to go get him. I handed him the phone, tears running down my face.

I still remember his face. Astonished and worried.

It is a face I will never forget.

Along with my grandma’s face when we told her.

I blamed myself.

I still do.

Sadly, I am not the only child that has to go through this. I did not even experience the worst of it.

According to Victims of Crime, which is the lead advocacy organization for victims of crime, one in five girls and one in 20 boys will face this while they are still a child.

“Three in four children will know their attacker,” Victims of Crime stated.

Eunie Alsaker, a counselor at Winona State, explained the process she goes through with survivors to help them heal.

She explained that she first teaches a survivor how to calm their muscles and slow their breathing when they start to go into fight or flight mode.

Yoga and meditation are two activities Alsaker normally recommends. This also helps a survivor to feel safe and balanced.

Alsaker explained that the process of healing after an assault is not a fast process.

“It can take years. It can often result in some anxiety, some fears. It can disrupt relationships with family members,” Alsaker explained. “Usually, trust (issues) is a very frequent response. You kind of have to learn who is trustworthy.”

I have experienced many of the above.

I am terrified of old men and beards.

I have a hard time in relationships because I am jumpy whenever a partner hugs me.

Alsaker continued by explaining that there are sights, smells and more that can trigger a survivor.

I know how that feels first hand.

When I see a green pickup with the bed covered, an old man with a scruffy white beard, when a male hugs me or when Arizona is mentioned, I feel a catch in my throat.

My heart speeds up.

I am suddenly that terrified 14-year-old girl again.

Just as Alsaker said, the only way I can come back to the present is by taking a deep breath and reminding myself where I am and that he is not here.

Another coping mechanism Alsaker suggests is self-care. Many survivors have a hard time sleeping, finding safe places, participating in hobbies and finding good people to be around during the healing process.

She also says that a lot of therapy is focused around normalizing the self-blame aspect that so many survivors suffer from.

I know that I still do this.

I still blame myself for hurting my grandma.

I know it’s not my fault, but that thought does not matter.

Heather Gerdes, gender-based violence intervention and prevention coordinator, explained ways of preventing an assault.

She said the campus RE Initiative pushes bystander intervention. She explained that it is mostly just being aware of your surroundings.

“When in doubt call 911,” explained Gerdes.

She also explained her belief that educating everyone on what consent is will be extremely beneficial in the long run.

Gerdes does believe that the culture is changing but that there is a lot of work to do.

“I do see the start of a culture that is changing,” Gerdes explained. “However, that comes with a lot of work.”

Like many, I am still healing six years later. I still get nervous around older men, pickups, hugs and the mention of Arizona.

However, I spoke up. He served deserved jail time. I do not know how much time. I did not want to know.

I can help to bring awareness to this horrid issue. I can help both children and adults.

I am the one in five.

I blamed myself.

I still do.

 

 

Madelyn Swenson is a junior majoring in mass communication-journalism at Winona State University. She is the news editor of the Winonan, the Winona State student newspaper, the president of the Society of Colligate Journalists and a DJ on the student radio station KQAL. In her free time, Madelyn likes to watch Netflix, hang out with friends and family, and read. Madelyn hopes to be an investigative reporter at a major news outlet. 

Deep Fakes

Until recently, photographs, video, and audio were considered a trusted form of communication and storytelling.

Then, photo editing technology and software was developed and photos were no longer considered to be fully trusted.

Some photographs have been altered so well it’s almost impossible to tell.

But videos can’t be faked, right? Wrong.

New technology is proving that to be false.

Deep fake technology has been developed to superimpose someone’s face onto another’s.

According to the computer science department chair at Winona State University, Mingrui Zhang, the idea behind the technology has been around for more than ten years.

It’s mostly been used for entertainment purposes such as the popular children’s movie Toy Story.

“It uses generative adversarial network (GAN) which is based on neural network algorithms,” Zhang said. “It is like any unsupervised neural network it learns from the subjects.”

According to a research paper by Robert Chesney, a professor at the University of Texas School of Law, and Danielle Citron, a professor at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, “Harmful lies are nothing new. But the ability to distort reality has taken an exponential leap forward with ‘deep fake’ technology. This capability makes it possible to create audio and video of real people saying and doing things they never said or did.”

This technology could pose as a threat to privacy and security, according to Zhang.

“It may bring up legal and ethical concerns,” Zhang said. “Those are also what computing education society is facing. The social implication of technology,”

Much like on the social media app, Snapchat, there is a feature that maps out a user’s face and can put photos of friends faces or other filters onto a user’s face.

Snapchat is similar to deep fake technology. Flaws can be detected rather quickly and the users can tell it isn’t someone else.

With deep fake technology, it is more complex but the results are better.

“For example, you want actor B to behave like actor A,” Zhang said. “You take video of actor A, the software will analyze the video and construct the skeleton of A, and A’s motion. In filming, wrapping the skeleton of A with the skin of actor B will make the audience think that B is in action. That’s how AVATAR was made, but the process is too expensive for average person. But with help of a machine learning algorithm like GAN, faking is possible for everyone.”

An issue where deep fake technology arose was in the porn industry. Users of the technology were placing celebrities faces onto others in porn videos.

This is an issue of consent and the well-being of those celebrities. They did not give permission to have their faces in those videos.

“Deep fakes make them available to average person. It started for entertainment, could be used to fake someone’s action who has never committed,” Zhang said.

Chesney and Citron wrote more on the effects of deep fakes.

“Deep fakes have characteristics that ensure their spread beyond corporate or academic circles. For better or worse, deep-fake technology will diffuse and democratize rapidly,” wrote Chesney and Citron. “. . . technologies—even dangerous ones—tend to diffuse over time.”

With that in mind, the porn industry may not be the only industry that is affected as it is hard to contain this type of technology.

Chesney and Citron also wrote about how deep fake technology could affect journalism.

“Media entities may grow less willing to take risks in that environment, or at least less willing to do so in timely fashion,” wrote Chesney and Citron. “Without a quick and reliable way to authenticate video and audio, the press may find it difficult to fulfill its ethical and moral obligation to spread truth.”

Video posted on YouTube by: Bloomberg